Squaretop Table with Fretted Brackets

The table shown by Fig. 47 has a square top with moulded edges, square tapered legs, and fretted brackets, and also has

8hel£

a shaped shelf undcrneath. The top is 1 ft. t) in. square by 1 in. thick, Fig. being a half top and half under-side plan. It mav be in one or more pieces. The legs are 2 ft. .*> in. long by 1} in. square at the top and 1J in. at the foot. The legs are splayed to bring the feet in the same vertical line as the edges of the table-top. The correct splay or batter for the brackets to the legs; they are also grooved on the inside for the tongued blocks which are used to secure the table top in position.

Fig. 47.—8quare-top Table with Fretted Brackets.

Fig. 48.—Half Plan and Half Underneath View of Square-top Table.

Fig. 47.—8quare-top Table with Fretted Brackets.

  1. 50.—Part Plan of Table Shelf.
  2. 51.—Shelf Housed to Leg of Table.
Fig. 49.—Fretted Bracket.

Fig. 51.—Shelf Housed to Leg of Table.

Fig. 62.—Securing Shelf to Leg of Table.

  1. 53.—Fixing Table Top to Brackets.
  2. 50.—Part Plan of Table Shelf.
  3. 62.—Securing Shelf to Leg of Table.
  4. 53.—Fixing Table Top to Brackets.

and shoulders may be obtained by making on a board a full-size dimensioned drawing of one side of the table. The brackets are prepared from f-in. stuff, fretted as «hnwn in Fig. 49, and are haunch-tenoned

Put the brackets and legs together temporarily, and see that they are quite home to the shoulders; then mark a distance of 1 ft. up on each leg for the mortice in which the shelf is to fit, and take the

nensions between the legs for setting out ? shelf, which is shown in part plan by g. 50. The shelf is housed to the legs shown in Fig. 51, and further secured •m spreading by a small block stub-loned to the under side of the shelf i bradded to the legs (see dotted lines Fig. 51, and the side view, Fig. 52).

Fig. 54.—Octagonal Occasional Table.

table is 2 ft. 6 in. high. The top is octagonal, 1 ft. 9 in. wide across the flat. The legs are square turned. First set out the legs for the haunched mortices at the upper ends, and for the stub-mortices towards the lower ends. The rails are 3 in. by | in., and the upper ones have haunched tenons which mitre together in the legs

  • 1.3
  • 1.3
  1. 55.—Elevation of Octagonal Occasional Table.
  2. 54.—Octagonal Occasional Table.
  3. 55.—Elevation of Octagonal Occasional Table.

Fig. 56.—Joint between Top Rails and Leg.

Fig.

  1. 56.—Joint between Top Rails and Leg.
  2. —8ection of Table Top.

i method of fixing the table top is shown Fig. 53. The work should be glass->ereii off and^dven a coat of size and iting. WTien/tlproughly dry, it should rubbed down nooth and given a second t; then again rubbed down, dusted, 1 given a coat or two of enamel paint, ernatively, the table may be stained, ¡d, and varnished.

Octagonal Occasional Table, fig. 54 is a perspective view of au octag-1 table. Fig. 55 is an elevation. The

Fig. 57. -Ends of Rails Glned and Blocked.

as shown at Fig. 50. The tops of the legs are 1$ in. square. The two lower rails cross each other with a halved joint. The ends of these lower rails are stub-tenoned to tit the mortices in the legs. When the legs and rails have been worked and properly fitted, they should be cleaned off and glued together; also glue blocks in the angles of the upper joints as shown at Fig. 57.

  1. 58 is a section of the octagonal top, which is built up of two thicknesses, the top piece being in- thick and the under strips $ in. thick by in. wide. In making this part, care should be taken to get good mitres between the various pieces forming the lower part of the top. This done, they should all be glued to the upper
  2. 58 is a section of the octagonal top, which is built up of two thicknesses, the top piece being in- thick and the under strips $ in. thick by in. wide. In making this part, care should be taken to get good mitres between the various pieces forming the lower part of the top. This done, they should all be glued to the upper
2.J

Lady's Work-Table with SUdin Body.

The work-table shown in elevation section by Fig. 59 has a top 3 ft. by 1 ft. i Under the frame is a sliding body or whose interior is fitted as a lady's wi box, with additional accommodation

part, and then the edges may 1m» moulded. The top is fixed to the top rails by small blocks glued to the rails, and also to the under side of the top. These blocks should be planed so as accurately to fit the angle formed by the two parts. On the lower rails is a small shelf which has a moulded edge. The shelf is fixed by means of glued blocks. As illustrated, the shelf is square, but an octagonal shape might be more table.

small pieces of unfinished work. A tn furnished with the usual assorted cd partinents for needles, cotton, etc., rt in the top of the well (see Fig. 60), U may be removed bodily, but accew 1 t he interj jr of the well is obtained ordinal throng'* the central compartment, wbf is bottomless, but which may, if piefeir be covered with a lid, stuffed out* with cotton-wool to form a pincuslu Immediately over the sliding body ii

working between solid guides d rail is tongued and grooved to the well,

  • framed into the rails of the table as shown in Fig. 62; a plough groove is n in Figs. 61 and 62. A shaped made in its edge, in which works the r is framed between the legs, and hardwood tongue. This must be fitted i small oval shelf, as shown in the accurately so that there is no side play, a, Fig. 63. The top and drawer It is best to fit it first rather tightly, and id the rails of the framing, are of then to rub powdered French chalk over iff, and the legs are l£ in., tapering the tongue. The rim of the well should
  • the joints connecting them to the be dowelled at the mitres, as shown in

Fig. 63.—Half Plan of Stretcher.

  1. 64. Part 8ection of Tray and Drawer.
  2. 63.—Half Plan of Stretcher.
  3. 64. Part 8ection of Tray and Drawer.
  4. —Part Section of Tray and iwer of Lady's Work-table.
  5. —Part Section of Tray and iwer of Lady's Work-table.

*.- Joint in Fig. 67. - Joint in table Legi. Rim.

  1. 66. - Well, Partly Withdrawn.
  2. 66.— Joint in Stretcher.

eing shown in elevation in Figs. 64, and in plan in Fig. 6.">. The well n. pine, square jointed and bradded. erwards veneered with wood to match mainder, which might be either ,ny or walnut, the marquetry in-fing holly, sycamore, or satinwood. > illustrates the sliding body. A ul is framed between the sides of >Ie, and a hardwood tongue, oak ference, is grooved and glued in s is stopped back 1 in. from the ige. A similar but slightly thinner

Fig. 67. The tray, which is 2 in. deep, is made of ,yin. stuff bradded together and glued, and lined with silk. It is advisable to glue a piece of green baize on the bottom to prevent scratches on the table top when the tray is taken out. To provide an opening for the drawer, the front rail of the table is cut through from the bottom edge to within J in. of the top, and the cross guides i> (Fig. 61) are kept flush with the ends of the opening. These guides must be well fitted and fixed with glued angle blocks, and screwed to the top as shown in Fig. 62, the bearers b (Figs. 61 and 62) being screwed to them. The table top, not being very wide, may be solid, and screwed to the out on that side, and the groove in the sliding rim must be taken through at the back, but stopped in the front to prevent disfigurement of the moulded rail (see

Fig. 69.—Folding Makeshift Table. > A
Furniture Iwer
  1. 66). The joint in the shaped stretcher is shown in Fig. 68. The two curved ends are first jointed together square, and then grooved diagonally through the middle; ( they are then glued up and bradded, thus forming a tapering mortice into which framing as shown in Fig. 62. The moulded rails c (Fig. 64) should be cut in tight between the legs, and fixed after the framework is glued up. It will be noticed that ^here is no opening at the back, neither *te drawer nor the sliding body passing
  2. 66). The joint in the shaped stretcher is shown in Fig. 68. The two curved ends are first jointed together square, and then grooved diagonally through the middle; ( they are then glued up and bradded, thus forming a tapering mortice into which

TABLES.

the tenon on the straight rail is fitted, the opposite ends of the curved portions l>eing tenoned into the legs.

Folding Makeshift Table.

Fig. 69 shows a table that is very handy when b large table is required out of doors, or for extra accommodation indoors, and which ran also be used as a paperhanger's table. Most folding tables are somewhat small, but this one is 5 ft. 10 in. long by 2 ft. wide. When folded it is 5 ft. 10 in. by 1 ft. by 3J in., and as all the part« are connected there is no fear of any portion being mislaid when wanted. A suitable wood for construction is deal, painted green or stone colour. Figs. 70 and 71 show the construction. The leg a (Figs, 70 and 71) stands in 1J in. from the edge

The sizes of wood are : For top, two bourds 5 ft. 10 in. by 1 ft.; for the ends, four battens p (Fig. 70), 1 ft. by 2 in. by 1| in. thick ; two blocks o, .'} in, by 2 in. by in. thick, and four legs 4 ft. 7 in. by lfl in. wide and 1| in. thick, with just the sharp edges planed off. Tho battens are screwed to the top, and lj-in. iron butt hinge» are used for joining the two halves forming the top. The tops and bottom* of the legs are bevelled as in Fig. 71, and the two inside legs r> and H are bored to take the j-in. round iron stretcher, the two outer legs a and O being slotted for the same purpose. The plates j (Figs. 71 and 7.1) prevent the nuts bruising the wood; they are 1) in. wide and of J in. sheet, iron. The hinges for the top ends of the leg» (see Figs. 71 and 75) are about 6 in. Ion«

  1. TX—Folding Table. Closed.
  2. TX—Folding Table. Closed.
  1. 13.— Fig. 74. Hinge Slotted Plate. for Leg«.
  2. TS.—Elevation of Stretchtr.
  3. TT. Jig. 78 Fig«. tt and t». Stretcher Clamp.

of the top. The wing nuts u (Fig. 70) should be as short as possible, any J in. k«ng, because the shorter they are the nearer the leg c can be to the outer edge of the top. This leg when folded comes as near p as the nut will allow it. On this also depends the distance apart of the ley» when touching the floor; the farther they are apart the firmer the table will <tand. The iron stretcher must have its • 'ritrc r exactly opposite the centre of the hinge a, and the part e must be sunk atly to allow the legs 0 and H to close it To obtain the length of the slot be plate j (Fig. 71), draw the arc i m from centre K, and then M O from N. the leg d to the top moves the and nut up the »lot. When an? closed the two ha'ves of the be folded together as in Fig. 72.

by 1J in. wide at the narrow portion, and the wide part is 3 in. by 2 in. long; the plates are countersunk at opposite sides, as shown in Fig. 75. In fixing the hinges, the narrow ends are screwed to the inside edges of the legs, and then the wide end» are screwed to the top. The stretcher i* shown in Fig. 76. The straight threaded ends go through the inside legs, and to prevent turning, half the diameter is let into the side of the leg, and the plate r (Figs. 76, 77. and 78) on the leg prevents the stretcher pulling through when the nuts are slackened if the table is being rlosed. When the table is open it is 2 ft. 5 in. high, and the nuts are screwed tight to prevent the legs closing. The dotted lines in Fig. 7fi show the position of the legs c and H when closed about r over the flattened part of the stretcher.

Hinged Leg.

rig.

Hinged Leg.

0 0

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