Squareframe Table with Elliptical

A parlour table will next be considered. A design for such a table is shown at Fig.

  1. 10.—Square-frame Table with Elliptical Top.
  2. 9.—Half Design for Table Leg.

to correspond with the mortice, are screwed to the under side of the top. This allows the top to shrink and swell without any danger of splitting. Fig. S is a horizontal section through a corner of the table, showing the leg rebated to receive the rails, which have a projection of about

Fig. 10.—Square-frame Table with Elliptical Top.

  1. 8.—Horisontal Sectio» through Garner of Bide Table.
  2. The part plan (Fig. 11) shows the top to l>e an ellipse, but the frame is kept square. The dotted lines show diagonal stretchers, which carry a shaped shelf with a small fore edge planted down on top of it. The legs are turned, and the outside corners of the square are rounded off. The stretchers are half checked where they cross each other, and are tenoned to the legs. The shelf is shaped and is fielded in this case instead of being square. Figs. 13 to 16 show different arrangements of mouldings. The edge of run on the three other rails to carry out the t same effect. Fig. 12 is a section through the drawer, showing the moulding and also the drawer bottom, which

Extending* Kitchen Table.

The material for making the extending table (Figs. 18 and 19) is good red or white deal, or the best pine. The sizes of the

Fig. 11.—Underneath Plan of Square-frame Table with Elliptical Top.

bradded down on top of them, the fore edges being fixed to the shelf. A drawer is placed in the middle of the rail; it has a moulding run on the top and bottom edges of the front. This moulding is also

  1. 15. Fig. 16.
  2. 13 to 16.—Sections of Various Mouldings.
  3. 11.—Underneath Plan of Square-frame Table with Elliptical Top.

bradded down on top of them, the fore edges being fixed to the shelf. A drawer is placed in the middle of the rail; it has a moulding run on the top and bottom edges of the front. This moulding is also

Fig. 12.—Section through Table Drawer.

the shelf is also moulded (see Fig. 17). The top is fixed in the same way as that of the rectangular side table (see Fig. 7, p. 2).

Fig. 14.

  1. 15. Fig. 16.
  2. 13 to 16.—Sections of Various Mouldings.
  3. 17.—Alternative Mouldings for Table Shelf.
  4. 20.—Underneath Plan of Extending Kitchen Tabla

Fig. 18.—Side Elevation of Extending Kitchen Table Cloaed, without

-ITT

Fig. 19.—Bide Elevation of Table Extended, with Leaf la-

several pieces are as follow :—Four legs, 2 ft. 7 in. by 3 in. by 3 in.; two end rails A (Fig. 20), 3 ft. 8 in. by 5£ in. by 1£ in.; two side rails c (Figs. 19 and 20), 3 it. 5 in. by 5£ in. by 1J in.; two inner rails d (Figs. 19 and 20), 3 ft, 5 in. by 4£ in. by right angles, and meet each other, thus allowing the tenons to be mitered as at g (Fig. 21). The parts should be firmly glued in, the side rails ploughed, each from the top edge, and the tongue, of some hardwood, inserted and glued to the inner

Flj. 21 —Jointa between Rails and Legs of Table.

  1. 22.—Conventional View underneath Table Top, showing Extending Arrangement
  2. 21 —Jointa between Rails and Legs of Table.
  3. 22.—Conventional View underneath Table Top, showing Extending Arrangement
  4. 23.—8ection through Side Rails of Table, showing Method of Securing Them.

1} in.; and two cross rails e and f (Fig. 20), 3 ft. 8 in. by 5J in. by 1J in. These are cutting-out sizes, and allow for waste. The top is formed of three leaves (two fixed and one movable), each being made of three jointed boards, ploughed and tongued, or dowelled and glued. The square legs look better if tapered to about 2J in. at the bottom as shown. The joints connecting the rails and legs are shown in Fig. 21; the mortices are at rails d. To hold together the outer rails c a cross rail e is dovetailed in (see Fig. 20), and as there is no great outward strain on the inner rails, the cross rails f can be screwed to them. The two fixed flaps should be secured by screwing into them obliquely through the rails. Should it be desired to extend the table to two or more distances to suit flaps of different widths, a handy contrivance for holding the rails firmly in position is shown in

Figs. 22 to 24. It is of square iron, bent to a right angle and rounded at the outer end, which is screwed for a nut. Fig. 2.*J shows that by tightening the nut the two rails are gripped together.

Fig. 34.—Clamp and Nut
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