Early English Sideboard

The design shown by Figs. 155 to 158 would look well if executed in oak, and either stained brown or fumigated, the chamfers being left in the natural colour ; or, if mahogany is chosen, the chamfers should be stained a deep red. Figs. 155 and 156

Fig. 162.

Figs. 161 and 162.—Joint for Mirror Frame of 8ideboard.

represent elevations, and from these and the plan (Fig. 157) a general idea of the construction can be gained. Fig. 158 shows a vertical cross section. As will be seen, with the exception of the top and bottom and the two shelves, which are solid, all the carcase is composed of framing. This method of construction, whilst entailing slightly more labour, yields much more satisfactory results in economy, strength, and lightness; but there is no objection to is required; but care should be taken to select stout and fairly true stuff, and, in the preliminary preparation, to plane off only just sufficient of the best surface to ensure the parts being straight and out

of winding, as the whole will have to be gone over again. Thicknessing is not absolutely necessary, unless the original thickness of the stuff varies considerably. The top, if possible, should be got out of one piece, but if jointing is found necessary,

Fig. 163.—Enlarged Horizontal Section through Drawers of Sideboard.

substituting solid divisions to the cupboard dowelled joints are more suitable than and drawer compartment. With the ex- tongued; any joints in the bottom and ception of the drawer fronts, which are shelf should be ploughed and tongued.

ljin. thick, no stuff thicker than 1 in. The V-jointed panels in the doors mad

ends should preferably be made up in narrow widths with tongucd joints, but, if desired, may be made in one width, and the V-grooves worked with a small rebate plane. The ease bottom, rupl>onrd top, and division are housed into each division, and have a tenon cut on their end* na shown, which fit« into the panel groove in the front and back rails. The corresponding rail* above the drawers are mortised to receive a J-in. tenon cut on the ends of the division stile*, which run

other and into the sides in. deep. The method of making the joint in the front nil of the cupboard top is shown in Fig. 159. The front rail and the •til»- of the division are each notched half-way through on opposite edges, and drimn tightly together ; the drawer runners A are grooved into the top rail of the right up for this purpose. The top division b is made to stand 1 in. above the runners, to act as a guide for the drawers, and a tilting piece 0 (Fig. 150) is screwed to the under side of the top to prevent the drawers tilting up when being drawn out. Similar pieces are glued and screwed flush with back and front rail», upon the two end«,

as shown in the section (Fig. 156), and to these the top is fixed by means of screws passing through slots to allow for shrinkage. The back is square-framed of 1-in. stuff with f-in. panels, nailing flat on the edge to the bottom, and setting in rebates square, are tenoned through the top, and are notched to receive the shelf. The rails of the gallery, which finish respectively $ in. and £ in. thick, are stub-tenoned in. The face of each standard has a sunk ovolo with double chamfer

Figs. 16S to 170.— Half Back Elevation and Half Longitudinal Section, Cross Section, and Half Underneath Plan and Half Horizontal Section through Drawer Level of Dinner Waggon.

in the sides and top. The mirror-frame below the shelf is dovetailed at the angles as illustrated by Figs. 161 and 162, and fitted tight between "the end standards, and sunk into |-in. rebates in the shelf and top. The frame is out of f-in. stuff, and stands J in. below the standards ; these are 1 in.

scratched in, and the ends are moulded into square finials (see detail, Fig. 160). The shelf is V-moulded on the edge and ends, and is supported by two 1-in. turned columns.

Doors.—The doors are hung with a pair of 2-in. by $-in. brass butts, and fitted

Figs. 16S to 170.— Half Back Elevation and Half Longitudinal Section, Cross Section, and Half Underneath Plan and Half Horizontal Section through Drawer Level of Dinner Waggon.

with 2-in. brass cupboard locks, and brass mediaeval drop handles; they are kept g in. below the flush of the framing, and

1 ft. 4 in. by 2j in. by 1 in.; two ditto. 1 ft, 4 in. by 5 in. by 1 in. Panels : Eight pieces, 1 ft. 11J in. by 3 in. by J in. Doors :

ri{ 171 Section through Dinner Waggon Fig. 171—Section through Part of Dinner

Shelf. Waggon Top.

  1. 1T1 Half Horizontal Section of Dinner Waggon through Shelf LeveL
  2. 173.—Section through Top Square of Dinner Waggon Leg.

ri{ 171 Section through Dinner Waggon Fig. 171—Section through Part of Dinner

  1. Waggon Top.
  2. 1T1 Half Horizontal Section of Dinner Waggon through Shelf LeveL

are stopped against j-in. by J-in. chamfered slips.

Drawers,—The drawers are dovetailed ami grooved in the usual manner, and stopped against. J-iu. square blocks at the back (see 'Pig. 163).

Cutting List.—The following cutting list shows approximately the quantity of stuff required, the actual sizes being obtained with exactness from the rod when the work ■-< -^t out full six©:—Carcase : One top, 0 ft. 6) in. by 1 ft. in. by 1 in.; one ■•ottom. 3 ft. 3 in. by 1 ft. 4} in. by 1 in. ; two shelves, 1 ft. 7 in. by 1 ft. 2J in. by ) in. Cupboard top : Two rails, 3 ft. 3 in. t>y 2 in. by 1 in. ; four runners, 12J in. by IJ in. by 1 in.; two panels, 1 ft. 4} in. »ty 1 ft. 1 in. by | in.; two top rails, 3 ft. 3in. by 2 in. by f in.; one cross rail, 1 ft. 1 in. by 2| in. bv | in.; two end ditto, 1 ft. 1 in. by 1 in. by j in. Division: Two stiles, ■J ft. > in. by 2 in. by 1 in.; one rail, 1 ft. 3J in. by 4} in. by I iu. ; one ditto, 1 ft. 3J in.

Fig. 173.—Section through Top Square of Dinner Waggon Leg.

Four stiles, 2 ft. 1 in. by 2J in. by 1 in.; two rails, 1 ft. 7 in. by 2J in. by 1 in.; two ditto, 1 ft. 7 in. by 2J in. by 1 in.; two ditto, 1 ft. 7 in. by 3J in. by 1 in.; six panels, 4 in. by 4 in. by J in.; ten pieces, 1 ft. 1J in. by 3 in. by J in. Drawers : Two front«, 1 ft. fif in. by 3j in. by 1J in.; two backs, 1 ft. »>} in. by 2J in. by J in.;

by j in. bv 1 in.; one panel, 1 ft. 7§ in. by I ft. 1 in. by j in. Ends : Four stiles, 2 ft 9 in. by 2$ in. by 1 in.; two mils, four sides, 1 ft_ 3 in. by 3J in. by § in.; two bottoms, 1 ft. 6 in. by 1 ft. 4 in. by i in. Back : Two stiles, * 2 ft. 7 in. by

3 in. by 1 in. ; one muntin, 3 ft. by 5 in. by 1 in. ; one rail. 3 ft. 3 in. by 3J in. by 1 in. ; one ditto, 3 ft. 3 in. by 7 in. by 1 in. ; two panels, 1 ft. 9 in. by 1 ft. 3 in. by \ in. Miiror frame : Two rails, 3 ft. 2| in. by 1J in. by J in. ; two stiles. 9 in. by 1J in. by f in. ; one baclç 3 ft. 3 in. by 9 in. by f in. ; one shelf. 3 ft. 5 in. by 10 in. by | in. : two standards, 1 ft. 3 in. by 1 in. by 1 in. ; two columns, turned, 9 in. by 1 in. by 1 in. Gallery : One xail. 3 ft. 3 in. by 1 in. by f in. : one ditto, 3 ft. 3 in. by 1 in. by \ in. ; eighteen balusters to pattern out of f in. by f in. by 2J in. ; sundry strips

Fig. 175.—Enlarged Section through Part of Dinner Waggon Bottom.

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