Early English Sideboard

The design shown by Figs. 155 to 158 would look well if executed in oak, and either stained brown or fumigated, the chamfers being left in the natural colour or, if mahogany is chosen, the chamfers should be stained a deep red. Figs. 155 and 156 Figs. 161 and 162. Joint for Mirror Frame of 8ideboard. represent elevations, and from these and the plan (Fig. 157) a general idea of the construction can be gained. Fig. 158 shows a vertical cross section. As will be seen, with the exception of the...

Paul N Hasluck

LONDON, PARIS, NEW YORK, TORONTO MELBOURNE. MCMVII Cabinetwork and Joinery is a natural outcome of* and sequel to, Cassell's Carpentry and Joinery, with which work it is uniform in style and price. Whilst the chief object of that work was to explain constructive principles adopted in the related crafts of carpentry and joinery, the present purpose is to give some hundreds of examples showing further how these principles are applied in everyday practice. The reader...

Coal Vases And Cabinets

The coal vase shown by Figs. 414 to 416 should be made in oak. The two sides must be got out first, these being of f-in. full board when finished. They are cut to the shape shown by Fig. 415, the above the extreme top point of the sides. It is cut 1 ft. in. long by 10 in. wide, f in. at each end being dovetailed on the under side to fit the grooves. The front edge is planed to a bevel the back edge comes to the corner of the rebate. The bottom, of -in. board, is 1 ft. f in. long by 1 ft. 3 in....

Squaretop Table with Fretted Brackets

Furniture Iwer

The table shown by Fig. 47 has a square top with moulded edges, square tapered legs, and fretted brackets, and also has a shaped shelf undcrneath. The top is 1 ft. t in. square by 1 in. thick, Fig. being a half top and half under-side plan. It mav be in one or more pieces. The legs are 2 ft. . gt in. long by 1 in. square at the top and 1J in. at the foot. The legs are splayed to bring the feet in the same vertical line as the edges of the table-top. The correct splay or batter for the brackets...

Rectangular Side Table

Table Drawer Section

The next table to be considered is a side or hall table. Fig. gt is a half elevation of the front of such a table. The legs are checked to receive the rails, which are carried all round, mitered at the corners, and screwed from the back through the legs. They are also blocked at the back, similarly to those in the previous example. A fielded channel is cut down the rail, finishing in a diamond pattern at the centre. A narrow rail is also carried Fig. Vertical Section through Part of Kitchen...

Overmantels And Chimneypieces

Classical Cornice Chair Rail Sections

The overmantel shown in elevation bv Figs. 181 and 182 should be made of oak or of walnut. It has three bevel-edged mirrors, two semicircular brackets shelf, and backing could bo mode of bass-wood, and the remainder of American satin walnut. This bass-wood, or whitewood as it is often called, will require two or more applications of stain to bring it to the same tono as the satin walnut, and Figs- 181 and 183. Front and End Elevation of Dining-room Overmantel I'fing tixcd immediately below...

Fallingleaf Gateleg Table with Turned Legs and Rails

Cabinetwork Tool

Fig. 35 is the general view of a table with a flap supported by gate legs. All the legs and lower rails are turned. Mahogany, oak, walnut, pitchpine, and yellow pine are suitable woods. The sizes of the various pieces may be varied to suit requirements. Having cut the necessary pieces to the several lengths, plane them up to the proper sizes. If desired, the legs and rails may be turned before being and a piece forked over the back see a legs, the upper rail being a little on the Fig. 37 . The...

Extending ft to pft Dining Table with Screw

The simple extending dining table shown by Figs. 25 to 2d should be made of mahogany, oak, or walnut. In Fig. 28, a is a half-plan from underneath, and b a half-plan inner rails or slides and the two cross rails should be of hardwood, such as beech or birch. The special screw can be obtained from almost any furnishing ironmonger. In constructing the framework, plane the stuff to the sizes given, and set out the mortices of the legs and the tenons of the rails see Fig. 29 . The mortices made for...

Bookcases

Tracery Joinery

Figs. 277 and 278 illustrate a simple bookcase with a cupboard underneath. The height from the floor line to the top is 6 ft., the width outside the ends is 3 ft., and the depth from back to front is 11 in. The lower part is enclosed by a pair of panelled doors, and the upper part, to receive the books, is enclosed by a pair of folding doors with glass panels, the two parts being divided by a table shelf, having a projecting moulding along the front and returned round the ends. The skirting or...

Upholstering Quaint Easy Chair

To upholster a chair of this description is hardly a job for the woodworker, but it is convenient to understand the process. Turn the frame bottom up, and web the bottom. No. 12 English grey webbing should be used from back to front, with six lengths of webbing, and from side to side with eight, using good J-in. tacks, and doubling over the ends of the webbing. The insides of the arms are webbed with six lengths from top to rail, and two lengthwise. The inside of the back will require six...