Drawerdivider Frames

Only the front 3 in. or 4 in. are glued to the case, allowing the case sides to move. Choose a frame type based on the desired look and the need for strength.

is the lack of sound glue surfaces between the frame and the case. Usually this isn't a problem, but for a tall case or one with unstable wood, you may want one of the other frame systems that use lap dovetails to tie the ends of the case together. The other types also offer the traditional look of exposed joineiy.

Start by laying out and cutting the dadoes, which are about Vi in. deep. I do the layout while the case is dry-clamped, using a stoiy stick to avoid measuring errors. The goal is to get the pairs of dadoes at equal height and parallel to the inside faces of the top and bottom. Square up the front ends of the stopped dadoes at an equal distance from the front edges of the case (about V2 in.). The front of the frame should be flush to the case edge, but the back should be inset about 3/s in. from the rabbets to allow the sides to shrink. Gauge the length of the dividers from the bottom of the dadoes, and cut them about V32 in. undersize to make the frames a bit easier to fit.

To connect the divider frames, I use mortise-and-tenon joints. When clamping and gluing up the frames, take diagonal measurements to check for squareness, and be sure that the frames are flat. A good tip is to level the joints on the top of the frame first. Then, as you test the frame and slide it into the dadoes, you can do all of your fitting from the bottom. The front 3 in. to 4 in. of the frame should be snug, but the rest can be eased to make it slide in the

DRAWERS

The two common drawer styles are flush and lipped. On the lipped style, the drawer front covers the gap for a more refined look.

dadoes with less drag. You will need to cut a shoulder in the front of the divider frame so it can extend past the stopped dadoes to the front of the case.

Stepped dovetails—Adding lap dovetails to the front of the divider frame gives it a strong mechanical connection to the

The two common drawer styles are flush and lipped. On the lipped style, the drawer front covers the gap for a more refined look.

Match the divider to the drawer. The dovetail with hidden dado offers a clean look for flush drawers (above), while lipped drawers look better with the stepped dovetail (below).

Match the divider to the drawer. The dovetail with hidden dado offers a clean look for flush drawers (above), while lipped drawers look better with the stepped dovetail (below).

case sides. The front rail will resist forces pushing the case sides outward, and it can be used to pull in bowed sides slightly. This traditional solution is called a stepped dovetail because both the dado and dovetail are visible at the front. I like to use this joint with lipped drawers, where the

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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