Angledjoint Detail

This jig allows you to cut angled and straight mortises in the legs with a plunge router. It also allows for mortising for the loose tenons in the ends of the side rails.

Straight mortise

Loose tenon

Fence, 8 in. long, rides along box sides to ensure straight cuts.

Mortise is angled.

Shoulder is angled.

Aluminum bar stock to fit router baseplate

Notch for end-mortising, IV* in. wide by 4 in. long

Wedge leg in box for mortising. Adhesive-backed sandpaper prevents the wedges from slipping.

Side rail

Wood screw

Plywood sides, 3A in. thick by 47/i6 in. wide by 26V* in. long

Angle block

Angle block orients the leg at 85.5°.

Set the block against one side of the leg before adding the wedges. Then cut the mortise with a plunge router.

Spacers elevate leg.

Wedges

Angle block orients the leg at 85.5°.

Set the block against one side of the leg before adding the wedges. Then cut the mortise with a plunge router.

Angle block

Spacers elevate leg.

Wedges

The front and back rails meet the legs at 90° and have standard tenons. But the side rails meet the legs at an angle. Instead of cutting angled tenons, mortise for slip tenons.

Start by angling the ends of the rails. Cut the side rails to length at 85.5°, paying careful attention to the orientation of the angle cuts.

The front and back rails meet the legs at 90° and have standard tenons. But the side rails meet the legs at an angle. Instead of cutting angled tenons, mortise for slip tenons.

Start by angling the ends of the rails. Cut the side rails to length at 85.5°, paying careful attention to the orientation of the angle cuts.

Workpiece

Wedges

Workpiece

Wedges

Mortise the ends of the rails.

These mortises are easily cut by wedging the rail vertically in the router box.

Glue the loose tenons in the side rails. The tenon should fit with a bit of hand pressure. If you have to beat on it with a mallet, the fit is too tight; if it drops out, it is too loose.

Now rout the side-rail arches. Rough-cut the curve on the bandsaw. For consistency, screw a router template to the tenons, and secure the assembly to the bench for routing.

Square up the mortises. Use a chisel and mallet and pare to the line.

The angled mortises in the front and rear legs can be cut using a plunge router and a router mortising box (see photos and drawings, facing page). You can use the mortising box, a mortiser, or chisels to cut the straight mortises.

Now add the decorative details on the rear legs. Taper the outside faces on the bandsaw and plane to the line. Cut the shallow pyramid heads on both the front and rear legs. Finally, cut the mortises for the square pegs in the crest rail.

Side rails meet the legs at an angle

With the legs complete, begin working on the seat rails—front, back, and side. The rail-and-seat staicture takes the bamt of the load, so use care when fitting the tenons.

The front and back rails meet the legs at 90° and have standard tenons. The side rails, which are angled into the front and back legs, are attached with slip tenons.

Cut the side rails to length at 85.5° at the shoulder line (see left photo, above). The rail should look like a long, thin parallelogram, not a trapezoid. Next, lay out and cut the mortises on the ends for the slip tenons using the router box. After mortising, fit and glue the loose tenons into the side rails.

Template ensures consistent curves in all of the chair rails

You want the arches in the rails to be consistent, so cut them to shape using templates made of Vi-in. Masonite. You'll need three templates for the seat-rail arches: one

Angled mortises made easy

It is certainly easier to cut straight, 90° mortises and tenons. But to conform to the body, the chair must have some angled joineiy. I've limited the angled joints to the side rails and the lower side stretchers.

The easiest and most consistent way to cut the angled joint is to bore the mortise in the leg at the required angle. Then you can simply crosscut the ends of the adjoining rails at the same angle, cut a straight mortise into the end grain of the rails, and glue in a slip tenon.

Square up the mortises. Use a chisel and mallet and pare to the line.

Mortise the ends of the rails.

These mortises are easily cut by wedging the rail vertically in the router box.

Glue the loose tenons in the side rails. The tenon should fit with a bit of hand pressure. If you have to beat on it with a mallet, the fit is too tight; if it drops out, it is too loose.

Now rout the side-rail arches. Rough-cut the curve on the bandsaw. For consistency, screw a router template to the tenons, and secure the assembly to the bench for routing.

Make the back-rest assembly

The rails of the back rest are curved on the front and back faces, and the crest rail is arched on its top edge. Both rails are mortised to hold the back splat, a curved assembly of narrow strips.

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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