Pyramids The Great and the Small

It's essential that assembly takes place on a flat, stable surface and that each component is checked for squareness and plumb as the clamps are tightened.

In a reflection of the medieval origins of his style, Stickley often softened the tops of his chair legs by milling mild chamfers that met to form a four-sided pyramid. You can duplicate this effect by setting a sharp, fine tooth, crosscut blade to 15 . then using your table saw's miter gauge to help you make these cuts. If your saw table is too big for the crooked back leg to lie flat, simply raise the blade, reverse the piece, and run the gauge in the opposite slot. To make the small pyramid plugs, sand long thin pieces of stock on your stationary sander with the miter gauge set at 15". Then trim them to length with your band saw.

Drawings for the locations of the screws (pieces 18) that will hold them in place. Predrill countersunk pilot holes for these screws, then cut the back bottom rail (piece 19) to size and mill mitered tenons on its ends (see Pinup Shop Drawings). Sand all the chair elements to 180 grit before starting the final assembly procedure.

Assembling the Chair

There's a logical order to the assembly process: you'll work from the back to the front. Begin by laying out all the parts and subassemblies, so you're not searching for pieces while reaching for clamps. Dry fit everything to make sure there are no problems before you start gluing. If you need a hammer to close any joints, they're fitting too tightly. Refine them as needed before going on with assembly.

Lay one of the back legs on its side, then glue the seat back subassembly, the back seat rail, the back arched rail and the back bottom rail snugly in place. Turn them upside down and glue their tenons into the mortises in the other back leg, clamping the entire subassembly so it is flat and square. Drive home the four small screws in the top, front screw mortises. Let the glue cure before moving ahead.

When the glue is dry, lay the back subassembly on its back and glue the two side subassemblies in place, along with the two side seat rails. Working quickly now, glue the front seat rail and arched rail into the front legs, then glue and clamp the front subassembly to the sides. Snug up your clamps and stand the chair on a flat, level surface before tightening them. Make sure that everything is square and true as you apply pressure, then drive home the rest of the small tenon screws.

It's essential that assembly takes place on a flat, stable surface and that each component is checked for squareness and plumb as the clamps are tightened.

Cut 2" thick high density foam on your band saw with the table set at 30°. The smaller face of the foam should match the size of the plywood. Round over the plywood edges.

To complete your seats, trim the leather to a 24"x 24" square. Then, on the rough side of the leather, mark a 3V square in each corner. Next, mark a 1" strip diagonally from the inside marked corner to the outside edge of the leather. Trim on your lines to create the shape shown above.

Cut 2" thick high density foam on your band saw with the table set at 30°. The smaller face of the foam should match the size of the plywood. Round over the plywood edges.

To complete your seats, trim the leather to a 24"x 24" square. Then, on the rough side of the leather, mark a 3V square in each corner. Next, mark a 1" strip diagonally from the inside marked corner to the outside edge of the leather. Trim on your lines to create the shape shown above.

Gently pull the side flaps up and secure the leather with staples. Keep the tension across the seat even. Pull the strip up snugly and staple as shown below. If the corner is too bulky, you may need to trim a bit of foam.

Gently pull the side flaps up and secure the leather with staples. Keep the tension across the seat even. Pull the strip up snugly and staple as shown below. If the corner is too bulky, you may need to trim a bit of foam.

Figure 2: Glue up the subassemblies of the back and chair sides. Make sure they are flat and square. After the glue has cured, move on to the final assembly.

On a level surface, check to see If your chair rocks.

If it does, make a line exactly the same distance up from the surface on all four chair legs. Sand carefully to the lines, and your chair will sit flat.

After the glue dries, plug all the screw holes. The easiest way to do this is to rip a long piece of stock to the thickness and width of the plugs, then trim them a little longer than you need them. Four of the plugs are sanded to small pyramids and glued in place. Tine rest are glued in place and sanded flush. Level the legs if needed (see below) and move on to finishing.

Finishing Thoughts

After a final sanding, I applied Bartley's dark walnut stain, then sealed it with three coats of a compatible low luster finish. Polyurethane is a good choice, because it's rugged enough to endure the constant handling and use of a dining room chair. Another good topcoat choice would be lacquer, if you're set up to spray it.

Stickley's seats were often upholstered in soft, brown leather. After all this hard work on the chair frames, it would be a fitting final touch for your chairs, too. For

Figure 2: Glue up the subassemblies of the back and chair sides. Make sure they are flat and square. After the glue has cured, move on to the final assembly.

instructions on completing that task, refer to the sidebar at left. When you're done, screw the seat support cleats in place and attach the plywood seat to them with screws. Then stick a felt pad (piece 20) to the bottom of each leg, and you're ready to start seating guests at your celebration dinner party. @

Fern Table

Includes full-size patterns for the feet and aprons. And details of the jigs used to form the aprons.

Patterns

Fern Table

Includes full-size patterns for the feet and aprons. And details of the jigs used to form the aprons.

Open staples carefully, remove pattern and fold staples back in place.

■ Use graphite paper (available at art supply stores) or cut and trace full-size patterns onto your stock.

I Cut out the elevation drawings and pin them to your shop wall.

Dining Room Chairs

Mortise and tenon locations, arched rail details (and a full-size pattern) and elevations for the additional arm chair parts.

Dining Room Chairs

Mortise and tenon locations, arched rail details (and a full-size pattern) and elevations for the additional arm chair parts.

Wall Mirror

Includes a full-size pattern for the top rail and all the mortise locations for the stiles and decorative plugs.

Wall Mirror

Includes a full-size pattern for the top rail and all the mortise locations for the stiles and decorative plugs.

Wedged Tenon Spice Rack

Includes a full size pattern of the wedge and the shelf tenon layout.

Wedged Tenon Spice Rack

Includes a full size pattern of the wedge and the shelf tenon layout.

Hard-to-find Supplies

Bookcase

Bartley Gel Stain #76851 $16.95

Bartley Gel Varnish #76661 S16.99

Brass Shelf Supports #30437 $2.29

Mirror

Gorilla Glue #14465 $13.99

Desk

Cnt. Drawer Slide (pair) #34942 $5.49

Desktop Fasteners (pk.) #21650 $3.99

Chair

Leg Pads #62513 $4.49

Bartley Walnut Gel Stain #76968 $8.99

Coat Tree

Garment Hooks (6 req.) #36095 $6.39 each

Hardware and other supplies needed to make the projects in this magazine are available from Rockier Press Inc. To order, call 800-610-0883. Please mention Code W4026.

STOODW ORKEK'S

wifOUlNÄL

m I Box 261, Medina, MN 55340-0261. VT © 2004, Rockier Press Inc. All rights reserved.

Position against fence Blade ?

Place top of apron here.

Jig 1

First cut for apron

Blade is set at 45°

Place bottom of apron here.

Position against fence Blade

Place bottom of apron here.

Jig 2

Second cut for apron

Place bottom of apron here.

Place previously / cut edge here.

Place previously / cut edge here.

Place top of apron here.

Note: Cleat Is glued on flush with edge.

Apron Jigs

Use the pattern above to create the t\ jigs (14" x 8" overall) at left.

Step 1: Cut the pattern out, leaving th waste at both edges, and lay out the . decorative mortise locations directly c the aprons.

Step 2: Trim the waste off the right sic the pattern and position the pattern a your Jig 1 blank. Line up the right edc the pattern with the right edge of the blank and trace around the pattern. U jigsaw to create the opening.

Step 3: Trim the waste off the left side the pattern, rotate the pattern 180° an position it on your Jig 2 blank. Line up freshly cut edge with the right edge o blank and trace around the pattern. Li jigsaw to create the opening. As show left, Jig 2 also receives a cleat to prev your apron from riding up during the c

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment