A STICKliEy Inspired Dinincj TABLE

Function and style, true tenets of the Arts & Crafts philosophy, are combined in the author's latest offering to create a project that will last for many generations.

By Rick White

Why I didn't see it coming is a good question ... I guess it was inevitable. As soon as I finished the Arts & Crafts dining chairs featured on page 30, my trusty old dining room table began a slow, sad journey to a garage sale. My wife, Susie, mentioned how much nicer those chairs would look in our dining room with a new table to match their style and finish. I had to admit she had a good point. So

I went to art director John Kelliher and asked him to work with me on a table design that would reflect the details featured in the chairs and the Mission style I like so well. The resulting table is even better than I could have hoped for ... Susie approves as well.

Ttoo Suggestions Before You Start

Throughout this project, you will be chopping stopped and through mortises to fit the various tenons and plugs. If I didn't convince you to buy a mortising machine with the Mission chair project, this table might just push you over the edge.

Suggestion one: get a mortising machine. It looks like a small drill press but can literally drill square holes for you. What a time-saving machine to own.

Gustav Stickley built most of his pieces from quartersawn oak for good reasons. It's attractive and one of the strongest species available in North America. Suggestion two: stay with quartersawn oak for this project. The cut yields straight boards with tight, parallel grain — ideal for tables.

Laminated, Quartersawn Legs

The legs of this table are built up in two major laminations (pieces 1), and the first step in construction is to cut these to the dimensions shown in the Material List on the next page. If the wide faces of these boards are quartersawn lumber, the thin edges will be plain sawn. The leg's most visible face after machining and glue-up would be the plain sawn view so, for appearance's sake, it must be hidden.

We will accomplish this step by gluing quartersawn leg veneer (pieces 2) to each leg, after the first two have been milled and glued up.

Machining the Legs

Each leg is mortised twice for a couple of rails. The dadoes for the top and bottom rails (pieces 3 and 4) are easily created on the table saw, as shown in Figure 1. Both are machined into the leg laminations before they are assembled. Follow the locations and dimensions given in the Leg Subassembly and Half-mortise Detail Drawings on page 54 to lay out both mortises. After milling, glue and clamp each leg together. Once the glue dries, sand each leg thoroughly and clean out any excess glue left in the mortises with a chisel.

Although both of these openings are technically through mortises, I covered the top mortise with the leg veneer (pieces 2) to create, in effect, a stopped mortise. The bottom mortise is continued through the leg veneer to expose the chamfered end of the lower rail's tenon.

Figure 1: The leg mortises are formed before the legs are glued up. Simply slice wide dadoes to form one half of each mortise.

Making the Rails Next

After cutting all the rails to the dimensions given in the Material List, refer to the Top Rail and Bottom Rail Tenon Detail Drawings (also on page 54) to lay out and mill their tenons. This is a job for your dado head and miter gauge on the table saw. (Don't forget to chamfer the tenon ends on the bottom rails.)

If you decided to invest in a mortising machine, this next step will be your first chance to use it. Refer to the Face View Drawings for the top and bottom rails on page 53 to lay out and chop the five mortises in each rail (see Figure 2). In the bottom rails, these mortises are a strong 3/8" deep, while those in the top rail are deeper. If you don't own a mortising machine, remove most of the waste on your drill press and square up the mortise walls and ends with chisels. This is also a good time to chop the small mortises in the legs for the plugs — the locations and dimensions are on the Leg Subassembly Elevation (page 54).

Apply the same technique for chopping the large through mortise for the beam (piece 10) in each bottom rail. Work from the outside so any minor tearout will occur on the inside, hidden face. Then use a strip of 1/4" hardboard flexed in an arc to lay out and band saw the arches on the bottom edge of each

Figure 2: A mortising machine will make short work of the many mortises featured in this project's Stickley-inspired joinery.

Figure 2: A mortising machine will make short work of the many mortises featured in this project's Stickley-inspired joinery.

MATERIAL LIST

1 Leg Laminations (8)

VU" x 3'/.," x 2674" 1/4" x 3'/2" x 267a" 174" x 5" x 31"

8 Pyramid Plugs (16) 1/2" x 1/2" x 5/8"

Etas Suerte

Figure 3: The glued-up tabletop will expand and contract to a significant degree. Oblong slotted screw holes allow that movement to take place while firmly securing the top to the leg sets.

top rail. The deepest point of this arch should be l'A" from the bottom rail edges. Sand these curves smooth on a drum sander.

Completing the Leg Sets

There's just one more task to perform before you can assemble the leg sets: you must make the 10 slats (pieces 5 and 6). Cut all 10 to the dimensions in the Material List, then lay out and mill 3/8" long tenons on their bottom ends. Use a dado set on the table saw or a router table and rabbeting bit for this work.

The tenons on the top ends are a little trickier. I used a jig similar to the one I designed for the dining room chairs. Details for how to make and use the jig in this project are shown on pages 52 and 53.

Dry fit the leg sets together and, when everything is fitting well, start the assembly process by gluing and clamping the rails and slats together. Next apply glue and seat the rail

1 Leg Laminations (8)

VU" x 3'/.," x 2674" 1/4" x 3'/2" x 267a" 174" x 5" x 31"

8 Pyramid Plugs (16) 1/2" x 1/2" x 5/8"

Figure 3: The glued-up tabletop will expand and contract to a significant degree. Oblong slotted screw holes allow that movement to take place while firmly securing the top to the leg sets.

tenons into their leg mortises. Predrill for the screws (pieces 7) and drive them home. Then cap the bottom ones with glued-in, pyramid plugs (pieces 8, see Pyramid Plug Detail, page 54) and the top ones with flush plugs (pieces 9). After the glue dries, sand the top plugs flush.

Building the Beam

The long, one-piece beam (piece 10) is tenoned on each end to fit the mortises you chopped earlier in the bottom rails. This would be an

15 Support Top Screws (16) #8x2"

16 Decorative Butterflies (5)

Table

(End View)

straight, quartersawn boards and cut them a bit longer than their final 88". Equip your router table with a feather board to machine the 1/2" wide by 1/2" deep grooves in these long, wide pieces, stopping the cuts 2" from each end of your boards. (Mill both edges of the internal pieces, and the inside edge of the outside pieces.) Rip five splines (pieces 13) from oak lumber, and then test fit the top (pieces 14) together. The splines aid in registering these long pieces of lumber during glue-up and add considerably more glue area to the top joints. When everything fits, glue and clamp the top together.

While I am a great fan of hand tools, in this case I wouldn't recommend planing the tabletop after the glue dries: it's just too large. Instead, bring it to a local cabinet shop and have them run it through their wide belt sander. (Make sure

9 Flush Plugs (16) 1/2" x 1/2" x 1/2"

11 Tabletop Supports (2) 174" x 6" x 35"

14 Tabletop Segments (6) VU" x 7" x 88"

15 Support Top Screws (16) #8x2"

unwieldy job for the table saw, so use the Beam Tenon Detail to lay out the tenons and mill them with a portable router. Chuck a straight bit in the router and clamp guide blocks to the beam to keep the cuts straight. When the tenons are completed, switch to a chamfering bit or use a block plane to create a traditional profile for the tenon ends.

16 Decorative Butterflies (5)

Dry fit the beam in the leg sets, then temporarily clamp it in place. Cut the tabletop supports (pieces 11) to size next, and use your table saw to mill the large chamfer all around both of these pieces (see Tabletop Support Detail, page 54). Next, use your drill press to create oblong screw holes in the supports, as shown in Figure 3. These allow for wood movement in the tabletop.

Predrill for the large screws (pieces 12) used to attach the supports to the legs, then apply glue to the top of each leg, set the supports in place and drive the screws home.

Gluing Up the Top

The top of this table is the most critical element, simply because it's the most visible. Choose defect-free,

Strip to accommodate

Curved shoulder top tenon

Routing Round the Bend

Matching the tenon shoulders to the top rail's graceful arc is simple with this shop-built jig. By holding the slats in the exact relationship as they will have in the table, the jig allows you to rout curved ends onto the slats and then, with the aid of a piloted 3/8" rabbeting bit, form the tenons' curved shoulders.

Make the top rails first, then transfer their curve to the jig's top edge, as shown below. The bottom cleat is mounted just proud of the plane of the jig's surface. The shoulders of the bottom tenons register against this cleat, as shown in the Section View below.

the Curved Routing Jig

Curved Tenon Detail

Create this curve using the top rail's lower edge.

Cleat Detail

(Section View)

Strip to accommodate

Making curved tenon shoulders is easy if you use this jig and a bottom-bearing, flush-trimming bit to form the curve at the top of the slats.

After you cut the slats to size and machine their bottom tenons, the spacers of this jig will keep the slats properly spaced as you rout _£ the curve onto their opposite ends.

Curved shoulder top tenon

Square -shoulder bottom tenon

Cutting Curved Tenons

Using Cleats For Table Top
Set the slats in place between the jig cleats and clamp them all in position. Use a flush-trimming, bottom-bearing router bit to shape the gentle curve onto the top end of the leg set slats. Set the bit depth so the bearing rides along the jig's top curve.

they can handle the 42" width before you haul the top to their shop, and scrape off any excess glue. You don't want to clog up their belts.)

After sanding, trim the ends with a clamped-on straightedge and a straight bit chucked in your router. Then gently break all the edges with sandpaper. Glue and fasten the beam to the leg sets with screws (pieces 15). Center the top on the supports and, after extending the pilot holes through the support pieces into the top, secure the top to the supports with the same screws (pieces 15). Don't glue the top to the supports. Restricting its movement widthwise could cause it to split.

Decorative Butterflies

Aside from the exposed joinery and plugs, the only truly decorative elements in this project are the five butterflies (pieces 16) inlaid into the solid oak top. Before the advent of modern glues, these butterflies would have been cut deeper than the 1/4" shown here, and they would also have served to hold the top together. Note the grain pattern of

Decorative Butterflies

The best way to make your butterfly keys is to clamp a set of blanks together and, with your table l$aw blade set to 14". make four cuts, as shown at left.

  • Top View)
  • Top View)

the butterflies is at odds with that of the tabletop. These butterflies are easier to complete than you'd think.

I like to create several at once on the table saw, cutting them to the shape shown in the Decorative Butterflies Drawing above. I clean up the edges with files, rasps and sandpaper.

Next, I make a melamine or hardboard template of the butterfly outlines to be used with a rub collar and a 1/4" straight bit in my portable router. It's important to rout a couple of practice butterfly

Top Rail (Face View)

Top Rail (Face View)

Move to your router table and use a 3/8" piloted rabbeting bit to form the shoulders of the curved tenons. Cut the cheeks on a band saw.

Move to your router table and use a 3/8" piloted rabbeting bit to form the shoulders of the curved tenons. Cut the cheeks on a band saw.

Use a template to rout the mortises for the decorative butterflies. A rub collar mounted in your router, coupled with a 1/4" straight bit, will get you started right. Be sure to test your setup in scrap lumber before you move to the tabletop.

Decorative Butterflies

The best way to make your butterfly keys is to clamp a set of blanks together and, with your table l$aw blade set to 14". make four cuts, as shown at left.

Table Elevation

(Top View)

scrap lumber to test the template before

you move on to your actual tabletop. Locate ---■

on the tabletop (see Jabie Elevation (S dc view, the Top View of the ~~ _^

Table Elevation, at right), and mark each butterfly's / outline ( with a I pencil. \

template to <J safely remove \ most of the inlay mortise waste with the router. Make the mortise depth 1/16" shallower Top Rail than the thickness of the butterflies. Tenon Detail

Clean up each outline with sharp chisels, then glue the butterflies in / 3V"" '

After thoroughly sanding all 1 .

surfaces of the entire project, apply V L—J y the stain of your choice (I used vt"

Bartley's dark walnut gel stain), __^

followed by several coats of clear satin finish. Or try Mike McGlynn's Half-mortise aniline dye technique described Detail -

on pages 19 and 70. As far as durable /

topcoats go, polyurethane varnish / " •

or catalyzed lacquer are the best /

choices for a tabletop whose primary use is serving food and drink. Apply \

a couple of extra layers to the top. \

Remember, a thorough knockdown n sanding between coats with 400-grit ^-^

wet/dry paper is the key to building a great-looking, smooth finish.

Beam Tenon —Detail

Tabletop Support Detail

Pyramid Plug Detail

Leg Subassembly

Bottom Rail Tenon Detail

Once the finish dries, set the completed table in your dining room, and pray your spouse doesn't start talking about how nicely a Mission hutch would match your table and chairs.

27s"

47a" T

By Brad Becker

ameyhnspired leather-top de5k

By Brad Becker

Without sacrificing any of the charm or structural integrity of our Stickley-inspired design, modern methods and materials bring this white oak desk within the reach of almost any woodworker's

Working as a cabinetmaker for a living might cause some people to forget their initial fondness for their craft. After all, work is, well, just work. But I have to admit, building this beautiful yet practical piece of furniture reminded me of all the reasons I started woodworking in the first place and helped me to remember how much I really like what I do.

This desk is a series of simple frame and panel subassemblies, joined with modern biscuits, hidden screws and glue. I designed the desk with basic joinery ... anyone with a little experience, a good router and a table saw will have no problem building this modern Arts and Crafts piece.

Starting with the Back

The back of the desk is made up of two rails, two stiles and three panels (pieces 1 through 4). Cut these and all the other parts to the dimensions shown in the Material List on page 58. With any project, measuring and test fitting each part as you make it is wise. The cabinet shop proverb — measure twice, cut once — holds true for all woodworking. Chuck a 1/4" bit in your table-mounted router, set the fence, and mill 1/2" deep grooves in both edges of both stiles, plus the appropriate edges of the top and bottom rails. (All dimensions are on the Elevation Drawings on the next two pages.) The groove cuts should be made in several passes, raising the bit about 1/8" each time to avoid tearout and excessive wear on the router.

"BUILDING THIS BEAUTIFUL YET PRACTIOU PltCE or EURNITURE REMINDED ftE Of Will THE REASONS I STARTED WOODWORKING..."

- BRAD BECKER

The inspiration for this desk appeared in L&JG Stickley's catalog circa 1906 - 09.

These stiles and rails have 1/4" wide tenons centered on their ends. Form them using a fine crosscut blade in the table saw coupled with the saw's miter gauge and nibble away the waste in successive cuts.

The tenons at each end of the bottom rail are notched 1/4" from the bottom. These cuts can be made on a band saw, but I prefer a sharp backsaw. With that done, you're ready to dry fit the frame together and check your joinery. When you're pleased with the fit, apply glue to the stile and rail joints (but not the plywood panels, as they need to float freely). Make sure the subassembly is flat and square as you clamp it up.

After the glue has cured, use a router and straightedge to plow a vertical 1/4" deep groove on the inside face of each stile. These grooves are a full 1W1 wide and will be used to join the interior frames to the back.

Figure 1: Tapering the outside faces of the legs adds an element of style to their blocky, rectangular shapes.

Building The Interior Frames

The interior frame subassemblies house the drawers and surround the desk owner's legs. Begin machining them at the router table by plowing a 1/2" deep groove in each stile (pieces 5) and rail (pieces 6) at the locations shown on the Elevation Drawings. Then move to the table saw to mill tenons on the ends of each rail. These are relatively simple cuts as no shoulder is required. Glue and clamp the two subassemblies together, again letting the panels (pieces 7) float freely.

Figure 1: Tapering the outside faces of the legs adds an element of style to their blocky, rectangular shapes.

This project uses simple joinery and modern materials, like this white oak veneer plywood, to create an authentic Arts & Crafts appearance.

The desktop outer panels (pieces 14) are solid hardwood. Attach them to the desktop center panel (piece 15) with just a few drops of glue. This allows them to expand and contract from the center of the desk.

14V."

The legs are tapered on the outside faces only. Make sure the quartersawn grain faces front and back.

14V."

Desk Elevation

(Front View) Qgjj

The desktop outer panels (pieces 14) are solid hardwood. Attach them to the desktop center panel (piece 15) with just a few drops of glue. This allows them to expand and contract from the center of the desk.

MATERIAL LIST

1 Back Frame Rails (2)

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2 Back Frame Stiles (2)

3 Back Frame Center Panel (1)

4 Back Frame Side Panels (2)

5 Interior Frame Stiles (4)

6 Interior Frame Rails (4)

7 Interior Frame Panels (2)

9 Exterior Frame Rails (4)

10 Exterior Frame Panels (2)

11 Desktop Sides (2)

12 Desktop Front & Back (2)

Desk Elevation

(Side View)

Craftsman Furniture Jointery

Leg Joinery Detail /

NOTE: The tabletop fasteners are located on the top of each leg.

Desk Elevation iy (T°P View)

The bottom-mounted drawer slides are attached to cleats glued to the back panel of the _ desk

Faux Tenon (Side View) (End View)

Biscuit \ and Frame Joinery Detail

(Top View)

Desk Elevation

(Back View)

Leg Faux Tenon (Side View)

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13 Large Screws (12) #10x3"

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13 Large Screws (12) #10x3"

14 Desktop Outer Panels (2)

V!" x 12" x 24"

15 Desktop Center Panel (1)

3/4" x 24" x 30'/2"

16 Top Faux Tenons (4)

1/2" x 1 Va" x 5/8"

17 Drawer Dividers (4)

1VV x2%" x 12"

18 Tabletop Fasteners (4)

Steel

19 Tabletop Fastener Screws (8)

Steel

20 Tabletop Screws (12)

#8 x 2"

21 Leg Space Shelf (1)

1VV x 9" x 2174"

22 Drawer Cleats (2)

1/4" x 3" x 7"

23 Leather (1)

25"x 31"

24 Leather Backer (1) 3/4" x 29'/2" x 23"

24 Leather Backer (1) 3/4" x 29'/2" x 23"

16"

A small 1/4'x Vk" notch allows the drawer slides to clear the front and back of the deep drawers.

Drawer Joint

(Top View)

The drawer fronts and backs (left inset) are rabbeted on their ends. Drawer sides (above right), have 1/4" dadoes milled across their ends. Both steps can be done on the same setup, as shown above. The 1/4" drawer bottom grooves are also formed on the same table saw setup.

17a"

MATERIAL LIST (DRAWERS)_

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25 Deep Drawer Sides (8) 1/2" x 4V-" x 19%"

26 Deep Drawer Fronts & Backs (8) 1/2" x VU" x 10V

27 Deep Drawer Bottoms (4) 1/2" x 10%" x 19Va"

28 Deep Drawer Faces (4) 3/4" x 47a" x 11%"

29 Drawer Pulls (6) Mission style

30 Deep Drawer Slides (4) 2T

31 Pencil Drawer Sides (2) 1/2" x 2V2" x 18"

32 Pencil Drawer Front & Back (2) 1/2" x 2V2" x 2WU"

33 Pencil Drawer Bottom (1) 1/2" x 20V x 171/2"

34 Pencil Drawer Face (1) 3/4" x 3V4M x 21%"

35 Pencil Drawer Slides (1 pair) 18"

Deep Drawer

(Section View)

The drawer fronts and backs (left inset) are rabbeted on their ends. Drawer sides (above right), have 1/4" dadoes milled across their ends. Both steps can be done on the same setup, as shown above. The 1/4" drawer bottom grooves are also formed on the same table saw setup.

CORNER LOCKING DRAWER JOINERY

Drawer Joint

(Top View)

The drawer bottoms are 1/2" hardwood plywood with rabbeted edges

A small 1/4'x Vk" notch allows the drawer slides to clear the front and back of the deep drawers.

Machining the Legs

Use either solid or glued-up stock to make blanks for the legs (pieces 8). Either way, have the quartersawn grain showing on the front and back faces of each. After cutting the legs to size, taper their two outside faces, as shown in Figure 1 on page 57. I used a commercial jig and great care to slice the angles off the legs (see the Desk Elevation Front and Side Views for taper dimensions.

Move back to the router table to mill the 1/2" deep stopped grooves in each leg to accommodate the sides and back. Stopping the grooves in the right spot is simply a matter of matching up pencil marks on the leg and the router table fence. Wrap up the legs by using a router equipped with a 1/4" straight bit to create the small mortises for the legs' decorative faux tenons (see the sidebar on the next page).

Building the Exterior Frames

Cut and mill the four rails for the exterior frames (pieces 9), using the same techniques as you did for the interior frame rails; just notice that the lengths are different. Notch the tenons on the two bottom rails (see the Elevation Drawings) to create 1/4" shoulders.

Test the tenons' fit in the legs, then cut the panels (pieces 10) to size. Glue and clamp the rails to the legs while slipping the panels in place without glue.

Building the Top

Begin making the top by creating a simple, butt-jointed frame with the front, back and sides (pieces 11 and 12). Start by cutting the parts to size, then chop the small, shallow mortises for the faux tenons and screws on the long frame pieces. Predrill each piece to properly accept the screws (pieces

Figure 2: Assemble the desktop frame and cut a rabbet in its bottom edge with a bearing-guided bit. Square the corners with a chisel.

13), then assemble the frame without glue. Turn the frame upside down and, using a bearing-guided rabbeting bit, mill a rabbet around the inside edge (see Figure 2). Square the corners with a sharp chisel after you're done routing.

Select solid hardwood stock with beautiful grain and figure for the two outer desktop panels (pieces 14).

FAUX TENONS

Form rabbets on the edges of each panel. (Note that on three sides, this rabbet is milled on the top face while on the fourth side it is milled on the bottom face.) Cut the center panel (piece 15) from 3/4" plywood and, after predrilling screw holes, attach it to the frame with screws only. Test fit the two outer panels to the center panel and frame. When all the parts fit together well, remove the screws and reassemble the top with glue and screws. Apply a couple drops of glue to the joint between the center panel and the inverted rabbet on the outer panels. This will ensure both panels will expand and contract out from the center of the desk. Finally, glue the top faux tenons (pieces 16) in place.

Assembling the Desk

Sand the subassemblies down through the grits to 220, and test fit all your joints (see Figure 3). Then lay out and mill the eight biscuit slots for the drawer dividers (pieces 17). Glue and clamp the two interior frames in their dadoes in the back, then glue the subassembly into the stopped grooves in the legs (don't glue the panels in place during this process). Before this glue begins to set, install the drawer dividers with glue and biscuits. Make sure everything is square as you tighten the clamps. Once the glue dries, use a Forstner bit to create round mortises in the tops of the legs (see the Leg Joinery Detail, page 59), then secure the tabletop fasteners (pieces 18) to the legs with screws (pieces 19).

To join the top and bottom subassemblies, start by placing the desktop on the lower desk assembly. From the underside, mark where the interior frames touch the desktop's center panel. Remove the top and drill pilot holes for screwing through the top into the interior fames, countersinking the holes from the upper face. Center the top on the desk body, then drive your screws (pieces 20) down through the center panel into your predrilled pilot holes in the interior frame's top rails (pieces 6). Finish securing the frame in place by driving screws (pieces 19) up through the tabletop fasteners into predrilled pilot holes in its bottom face, then attach the leg space shelf (piece 21) with screws (pieces 13). Take a moment to glue the drawer cleats (pieces 22) to the plywood panels inside the drawer cavity (refer to the Elevation Drawings on pages 58 and 59).

Drill a finger hole in the top's center panel to help lift the removable leather covered panel, then cut the leather (piece 23) and its backer (piece 24) to shape and dry fit them to the top of the desk. When the fit is right, glue the leather to the backer with 3M's 77 spray adhesive.

Faux Tenons
Figure 3: Before final assembly, test fit the joints between pre-made subassemblies, such as the back subassembly and the legs.

Making the Drawers

Refer to the sidebar (previous page, upper left) to mill the joinery on the sides, fronts and backs of the four deep drawers and the shallow pencil drawer (pieces 25 through 35). Assemble each box and sand smooth. Cut the drawer faces from attractive hardwood stock. Mount the drawer pulls with their bolt heads counterbored flush into the back of the drawer faces.

With the drawer boxes complete, install the drawer slides according to the manufacturer's instructions, then slide the drawers into their openings. Use double-sided tape to temporarily position and mark the locations of the drawer faces, then screw the faces in place. Install the remaining faux tenons. Remove the drawer faces and hardware for finishing.

Wrap up this project by applying a light walnut oil stain, topped by at least three coats of clear matte lacquer. Sand between these coats with 400-grit paper. Reinstall the drawer faces and drawer pulls after the finish dries. & _/

Be sure to make each size faux tenon in sets. Use a registration block clamped to your miter gauge to ensure uniformity.

There are two different size faux tenons on this desk. The top frame set have larger tails and cover a set of screws. The leg set are machined with tiny tenoned tails to glue into 1/4" mortises. They're easy to make and ensure a clean attractive look.

Machine the faux tenons in three steps: Chamfer the ends and edges of your stock on a sander, relieve the tenon tails on your table saw, and slice them free with a band saw and miter gauge.

Be sure to make each size faux tenon in sets. Use a registration block clamped to your miter gauge to ensure uniformity.

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Responses

  • jonas
    How to make faux tenon?
    8 years ago

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